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Based on my experience helping to design classification systems, the following compares and contrasts two different classification schemes, and provides a model that truly reflects ITIL practices.

Many IT Service Management tools that offer Incident management automation use a simple Category/Type/Item (CTI) for classification.

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ITIL Project Management (Transition Planning and Support) is a new process in ITIL V3; ITIL V2 covered some aspects of this process within Release Management but ITIL V3 provides considerably enhanced guidance.

Transition Planning and Support in ITIL V3 is mostly about managing service transition projects, so at IT Process Maps we decided to make this clear by slightly changing its name to Project Management (Transition Planning and Support).

ITIL does not provide a detailed explanation of all aspects of Project Management.

Clearly, we need another approach that is less technical, and more flexible.

Lets go all the way back to what exactly is an Incident.

Classification is neither to determine root cause nor technical causes of the incident.

Most Service Desk staff (those performing Classification and Initial Support) will not know the cause of an Incident until the call is closed. Initial support means proper analysis, evaluation and if required, routing.

According to ITIL, the goal of Incident classification and Initial support is to: Thus, Incident classification exists primarily to classify incidents in order to provide initial support.

The basics of classification have been presented in previous articles (see below for links).

In this article I want to explore the issues behind the actual classification hierarchy itself, which is where most practitioners experience problems.

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